Exploring the health of university undergraduate students in relation to housing accommodations

Date
2017-07-01
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Abstract
This thesis examines the links between type of housing and health of university undergraduate students (n=213) at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (University of Ontario Institute of Technology). Housing was classified into three categories of housing accommodations: at home with their families, on-campus residences, and off-campus housing. A self-administered health questionnaire was developed for the purpose of this research. The research objectives include: 1) to assess the environmental and personal lifestyle exposures of University of Ontario Institute of Technology undergraduate students, in relation to the three different types of housing accommodations; 2) to assess the general health of University of Ontario Institute of Technology undergraduate students, with a focus on respiratory, gastrointestinal, and dermatological health; and 3) to examine predictors of related health outcomes. Guided by the Population Health Framework, the health questionnaire collected data related to the students’ physical environments, social environments, genetic endowment, individual and behavioral responses, health and function, and health care. Results indicate that most participants live at home with their families. Students living at home reported higher stress levels compared to those living in an on-campus residence building. The prevalence of the studied symptoms are as follows: fair or poor self-rated health (10.8%), respiratory related illness (35.7%), nausea and vomiting (37.6%), and skin irritations (42.3%). Results suggest there are no significant differences in health based on type of housing accommodation.
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Keywords
Health, Housing, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, Dermatological
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